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Ham Satellite news

CAS-10 Information

Info from AMSAT bulletin board and Alan Kung BA1DU:

China CAS-10 Ham Radio Satellite to Launch in November

CAMSAT reports the CAS-10 (XW-4) amateur radio satellite with a V/U linear transponder, is expected to be launched to the Tiangong Space Station on November 7, 2022.

On the AMSAT bulletin board Alan Kung BA1DU posted:

The CAMSAT CAS-10 (XW-4) amateur satellite has been shipped to the Wenchang Satellite Launch Center in Hainan China, and has been installed in the Tianzhou-5 cargo spacecraft, which is scheduled to be launched on November 6 using the Long March 7 launch vehicle to China Tiangong Space Station.

The CAS-10 (XW-4) satellite will deploy from the space station into its own orbit around December 15, and the amateur radio payload will be operational immediately after that time. The specific deployment time and satellite orbit TLE will be announced later.

The IARU satellite frequency coordination page reports:

An 8U CubeSat approx 228 x455x 100mm 12kg Mass. A follow on mission from CAS-9 and also known as Hope-4 (XW-4) Carrying a V/U Mode Linear Transponder, a UHF – CW Telemetry Beacon, a UHF – AX.25 4.8k/9.6kbps GMSK Telemetry downlink and a space camera.

  1. CAS-10 carries a VHF uplink and UHF downlink linear transponder with a bandwidth of 30kHz. This transponder will work all day during the life cycle of the satellite, and amateur radio enthusiasts around the globe can use it for two-way radio relay communications.
  2. CAS-10 carries a camera, and the pictures it takes are stored in the flash memory on the satellite, we have designed a simple remote control system based on DTMF, and amateur radio enthusiasts around the globe can send DTMF commands to download the camera photos.
  3. CW beacon uses Morse code to send satellite telemetry data, which is also a feature that is widely welcomed by amateur radio enthusiasts.

Downlink frequencies for VHF/UHF linear transponder 435.180 MHz, for UHF CW telemetry beacon 435.575 MHz and for telemetry 435.725 MHz. Also an uplink for the transponder 145.870 MHz have been coordinated.

[ANS thanks Southgate Amateur Radio News for the above information.]

Categories
Ham Satellite news

Tracking Artemis-1 with PstRotator

Thank you Codrut YO3DMU of PstRotator for the following info:

You can use the DSN module of the PstRotator program for Artemis-1 tracking. The program automatically download the necessary files from Horizons and use them to control the rotator and the radio with Doppler corrections.

At this moment the ephemeris are not yet available, but these will be at a short time after a successfully launch.

You can find here the Artemis 1 mission frequency allocation: https://sgcderek.github.io/blog/artemis-1.html 
The Omotenashi satellite will be interesting as it will use UHF (437 MHz).

Categories
Ham Satellite news

OMOTENASHI to the Moon 29 aug 2022

Info from ANS:

OMOTENASHI Project Shoots for the Moon This Week

OMOTENASHI, a project of the JAXA Ham Radio Club, is a CubeSat which will be launched by NASA SLS rocket, scheduled for August 29. It plans to land on the surface of the moon, and to transmit a beacon in the amateur 70cm band.

OMOTENASHI is one of the EM-1 CubeSat missions which will be launched by the NASA/SLS rocket (EM-1) together with the main mission of ORION experimental module on Monday. JAXA Ham Radio Club is going to utilize the flight demonstration opportunity of the OMOTENASHI mission to conduct the following amateur radio missions:
(i) To conduct technological research with respect to receiving ultra-weak UHF signal from a space probe toward the moon
(ii) To conduct an outreach activity providing amateur radio operators all over the world with an opportunity to try to receive signals from moon region.

OMOTENASHI is a 6U-CubeSat with external dimensions of 239 x 366 x 113mm and an approximate mass of 14 kg.

OMOTENASHI consists of three modules: orbiting module, retro motor module, and surface probe. During the moon transfer orbit, these modules are integrated. When OMOTENASHI arrives at the moon, the surface probe will be separated and conduct semi-hard landing.

OMOTENASHI is actively controlled by ultra-small attitude control system including star tracker, sun sensor, IMU, reaction wheel, and cold gas jet thruster. During the moon transfer orbit, OMOTENASHI may be spin-stabilized due to the strict resources. For further details, please see: https://www.isas.jaxa.jp/home/omotenashi/JHRCweb/jhrc.html

There will be UHF CM/PSK/PM/PSK31 beacons, with 1 watt RF, on both the orbiting module and the surface probe. CisLunar explorer, MIT KitCube and Lunar IceCube are expected to share the same launch.

Orbiting Module DOWNLINK

Frequency
    437.31 MHz
Antenna
    SRR antenna
Polarization
    Linear
Modulation
    beacon, PSK31
Sync Word
    C1 (ASCII code)
Power
    30dBm

Surface Probe DOWNLINK

Frequency
    437.41 MHz
Antenna
    invert-F antennax4
Polarization
    LHCP(, RHCP)
Modulation
    FM, PSK31, PCM-PSK/PM
Sync Word
    C1 (ASCII code)
Power
    30dBm

Amateurs can constantly access the newest TLE from https://bit.ly/3wyopTr This file will be overwritten when we have calculated the next TLE during operation.

[ANS thanks JAXA Ham Radio Club for the above information]


Categories
Ham Satellite news

Operating Tips for FM Satellites

From ANS-212 Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA, AO-91 Control Operator, and Mark Johns, K0JM:

Recent abuses on AO-91, and continued bedlam on FM satellites generally, have raised a growing number of complaints among operators and control stations. Here are some tips to help everyone enjoy these satellites and avoid being labeled as a bad actor:

  1. LISTEN! These satellites are almost always busy when over populated areas. If you aren’t hearing activity on the downlink, it is unwise to make a “blind” call on the uplink frequency. Getting into the satellite is often easier than hearing it. Make certain you copy the downlink before transmitting.
  2. NO CQs. FM satellites have a single channel and many stations are attempting to use the channel in a limited time. There is no time for calling CQ, or for repeatedly announcing your own call. Instead, listen for stations already active on the pass, and when you have an opportunity, make a call to a specific station you wish to work.
  3. BE COURTEOUS. If Station A calls Station B, give Station B at least a millisecond or two to answer, and let them complete their brief QSO. Avoid interrupting or jumping on top of a contact in progress. Give priority to rovers or other special stations that many are anxious to contact.
  4. BE WELCOMING. Make an effort to make calls to unfamiliar callsigns you’ve not yet worked before. Let newcomers have a chance, rather than shutting them out to say hello to stations you greet everyday.
  5. DON’T BE A LID! Do “testing,” whistling, or “hello” someplace else. Modes other than FM voice have no place on these satellites. If you wish to experiment with FT modes, please feel free to do so on AO-109, but definitely NOT on an FM satellite.
Categories
Ham Satellite news

Hams.at activation web page

hams.at is a new satellite activation page by WW1X currently in beta state. This page makes it possible to enter your satellite activation and as a chaser station you can get a track of overlapping passes. It also has i very nice integration to Satmatch and a direct tweet generation for Twitter.

I hope this page can be a central hub for upcoming satellite activations for all users.

Categories
Ham Satellite news

FUNcube-1 / AO73 Update

AO-73. Photo by Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG
AO-73. Photo by Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG

From the Funcube web:

Many will be aware that FUNcube-1 has been transmitting a special Fitter message to commemorate her Majesty the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee earlier this month. Everyone who receives this message and uploads it to the Data Warehouse using the Dashboard can generate a certificate to remember this historic event. The special message includes a link to a website that has the full instructions. It is intended to keep this message active until the end of June.

The spacecraft’s orbit continues to run near the sun’s terminator and this is resulting in less than optimal solar power generation. The battery bus voltage is now centering around 7.45 volts rather than the 8+ volts that we have seen for many years. We believe that this reduced voltage level may be due to a combination of factors, illumination levels, battery and/or solar panel degradation or, possibly, gradual changes in some component values within the EPS. It is also possible that the high spin/tumble rates that we experienced over the recent months may be involved. Our thanks to to Colin VK5HI and his team for continuing to keep track of this issue for us.

Operators may have noticed that the spacecraft is now in high power telemetry mode when in sunlight and in receive only mode during eclipse. Although the transponder is not currently active, with the rapid fading presently being experienced on the downlink, the high power telemetry setting will assist listeners to decode the data more easily.

We continue to be extremely grateful to all those stations who continue to contribute their data to the FUNcube data warehouse. The information you are providing is invaluable to the FUNcube to team and will greatly assist us in managing the spacecraft through its “middle age” after more than eight years in space!