Categories
Ham Satellite news

OMOTENASHI to the Moon 29 aug 2022

Info from ANS:

OMOTENASHI Project Shoots for the Moon This Week

OMOTENASHI, a project of the JAXA Ham Radio Club, is a CubeSat which will be launched by NASA SLS rocket, scheduled for August 29. It plans to land on the surface of the moon, and to transmit a beacon in the amateur 70cm band.

OMOTENASHI is one of the EM-1 CubeSat missions which will be launched by the NASA/SLS rocket (EM-1) together with the main mission of ORION experimental module on Monday. JAXA Ham Radio Club is going to utilize the flight demonstration opportunity of the OMOTENASHI mission to conduct the following amateur radio missions:
(i) To conduct technological research with respect to receiving ultra-weak UHF signal from a space probe toward the moon
(ii) To conduct an outreach activity providing amateur radio operators all over the world with an opportunity to try to receive signals from moon region.

OMOTENASHI is a 6U-CubeSat with external dimensions of 239 x 366 x 113mm and an approximate mass of 14 kg.

OMOTENASHI consists of three modules: orbiting module, retro motor module, and surface probe. During the moon transfer orbit, these modules are integrated. When OMOTENASHI arrives at the moon, the surface probe will be separated and conduct semi-hard landing.

OMOTENASHI is actively controlled by ultra-small attitude control system including star tracker, sun sensor, IMU, reaction wheel, and cold gas jet thruster. During the moon transfer orbit, OMOTENASHI may be spin-stabilized due to the strict resources. For further details, please see: https://www.isas.jaxa.jp/home/omotenashi/JHRCweb/jhrc.html

There will be UHF CM/PSK/PM/PSK31 beacons, with 1 watt RF, on both the orbiting module and the surface probe. CisLunar explorer, MIT KitCube and Lunar IceCube are expected to share the same launch.

Orbiting Module DOWNLINK

Frequency
    437.31 MHz
Antenna
    SRR antenna
Polarization
    Linear
Modulation
    beacon, PSK31
Sync Word
    C1 (ASCII code)
Power
    30dBm

Surface Probe DOWNLINK

Frequency
    437.41 MHz
Antenna
    invert-F antennax4
Polarization
    LHCP(, RHCP)
Modulation
    FM, PSK31, PCM-PSK/PM
Sync Word
    C1 (ASCII code)
Power
    30dBm

Amateurs can constantly access the newest TLE from https://bit.ly/3wyopTr This file will be overwritten when we have calculated the next TLE during operation.

[ANS thanks JAXA Ham Radio Club for the above information]


Categories
Changes on amsat.se

How to find articles on AMSAT-SM web

We have done some cleanup in the articles and posts on AMSAT-SM website. The “How to…”-articles and guidelines are now under three submenus:

Some articles can be found under more then one submenu, for example if it covers both “Beginners” and “SDR”.

In news categories you find news in different areas. Some of these posts can also be categorized as an article and also be found under “Articles and guides”.

We also use tags. Let’s say you read a post about IC-705. If you would like to read all posts about IC-705 then click on the tag at the bottom of the post.

Finally, you can of course search in all posts and articles.

Categories
Hamradio from ISS

ISS Digipeater active 145.825 MHz

As noted by many ISS AX.25 packet digipeater is now active on 145.825 MHz. For example see this SatNOGS decode: https://network.satnogs.org/observations/6325502/

ARISS is pleased to announce that starting yesterday, August 11,
simultaneous operations of the ARISS Voice Repeater and digital APRS
communications on the International Space Station (ISS) is now a
reality. Current ARISS operations include voice repeater
transmissions with the JVC Kenwood D710GA in the Columbus module and
APRS packet operation from an identical radio in the Service Module
(Zvezda). Packet operations are on 145.825 MHz.

The ARISS Russia and USA teams have been working for several weeks to
prepare the Service Module radio for APRS operations. ARISS Russia
team member Sergey Samburov, RV3DR, led the effort, working with
Russian mission controllers and the on-board ISS cosmonauts to
configure the Service Module radio for APRS ops. On August 11, final
checkouts were completed and the APRS packet mode was switched on for
amateur radio use.

ARISS-International Chair Frank Bauer, KA3HDO states, “Simultaneous
operation of APRS and the voice repeater on ISS is transformative for
ARISS and represents a key element of our ARISS 2.0 initiative,
providing interactive capabilities 24/7 that inspire, engage and
educate youth and lifelong learners—especially life-long learning in
ham radio operations.” Bauer continues, “Our heartfelt thanks to
Sergey Samburov, RV3DR, for making this crucial ARISS 2.0 initiative
become a reality.”

The Columbus Module radio uses the callsign NA1SS and the new Service
Module radio uses RS0ISS. Aside from the callsigns, the radios are
identical and packet operations are the same as before. You can use
RS0ISS, ARISS, or APRSAT as the packet path. Also, both radios are
expected to be on full time, except during educational contacts, EVAs,
and dockings or undockings.

You can find operational status and expected downtimes of the ISS
radios at https://www.ariss.org/current-status-of-iss-stations.

[ANS thanks Dave Jordan, AA4KN, ARISS PR, for the above information]

Categories
Telemetry

SWSU telemetry over Stockholm 2022-08-08

Several of the SWSU satellites spotted/heard over Stockholm. Strong downlinks, antenna (13 el Yagi) fixed position Az: 147 El: 7

SWSU-55 #1 & R-390 (SWSU #5)
Callsign: RS10S
Telemetry: 437.050 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK;
Payload: 437.050 MHz 1200/2400/4800 bps .AX25 AFSK, SSTV, AUDIO, TEXT;

SWSU-55 No. 2 (SWGU No. 6)
Callsign: RS11S
Telemetry: 437.050MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK;
Payload: 437.062 MHz 1200/2400/4800 bps .AX25 AFSK, SSTV, AUDIO, TEXT;

SWSU-55 No. 3 (SWGU No. 7)
Callsign: RS1S
Telemetry: 437.050 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK;
Payload: 437.075 MHz 1200/2400/4800 bps .AX25 AFSK, SSTV, AUDIO, TEXT;

SWSU-55 No. 4 (SWGU No. 8)
Callsign: RS2S
Telemetry: 437.050 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK;
Payload: 437.082 MHz 1200/2400/4800 bps .AX25 AFSK, SSTV, AUDIO, TEXT;

SWSU-55 No. 5 (SWGU No. 9)
Callsign: RS3S
Telemetry: 437.050 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK;
Payload: 437.100 MHz 1200/2400/4800 bps .AX25 AFSK, SSTV, AUDIO, TEXT;

SWSU-55 No. 6 (SWGU No. 10)
Callsign: RS4S
Telemetry: 437.050 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK;
Payload: 437.087 MHz 1200/2400/4800 bps .AX25 AFSK, SSTV, AUDIO, TEXT;

SWSU-55 №7 & R-390 (SWGU №11)
Callsign: RS5S
Telemetry: 437.050 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK;
Payload: 437.1125 MHz 1200/2400/4800 bps .AX25 AFSK, SSTV, AUDIO, TEXT;

SWSU-55 No. 8 (SWGU No. 12)
Callsign: RS6S
Telemetry: 437.050 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK;
Payload: 437.000 MHz 1200/2400/4800 bps .AX25 AFSK, SSTV, AUDIO, TEXT;

Tsiolkovsky-Ryazan 1
Callsign: RS9S
Telemetry: 437.050 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK;
Payload: 437.025 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK, SSTV, AUDIO, TEXT;

Tsiolkovsky-Ryazan 2
Callsign: RS12S
Telemetry: 437.050 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK;
Payload: 437.0125 MHz 1200 bps .AX25 AFSK, SSTV, AUDIO, TEXT;

Categories
Ham Satellite news

Operating Tips for FM Satellites

From ANS-212 Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA, AO-91 Control Operator, and Mark Johns, K0JM:

Recent abuses on AO-91, and continued bedlam on FM satellites generally, have raised a growing number of complaints among operators and control stations. Here are some tips to help everyone enjoy these satellites and avoid being labeled as a bad actor:

  1. LISTEN! These satellites are almost always busy when over populated areas. If you aren’t hearing activity on the downlink, it is unwise to make a “blind” call on the uplink frequency. Getting into the satellite is often easier than hearing it. Make certain you copy the downlink before transmitting.
  2. NO CQs. FM satellites have a single channel and many stations are attempting to use the channel in a limited time. There is no time for calling CQ, or for repeatedly announcing your own call. Instead, listen for stations already active on the pass, and when you have an opportunity, make a call to a specific station you wish to work.
  3. BE COURTEOUS. If Station A calls Station B, give Station B at least a millisecond or two to answer, and let them complete their brief QSO. Avoid interrupting or jumping on top of a contact in progress. Give priority to rovers or other special stations that many are anxious to contact.
  4. BE WELCOMING. Make an effort to make calls to unfamiliar callsigns you’ve not yet worked before. Let newcomers have a chance, rather than shutting them out to say hello to stations you greet everyday.
  5. DON’T BE A LID! Do “testing,” whistling, or “hello” someplace else. Modes other than FM voice have no place on these satellites. If you wish to experiment with FT modes, please feel free to do so on AO-109, but definitely NOT on an FM satellite.
Categories
Telemetry

Celesta received and decoded

#Celesta received over Stockholm 2022-07-26 and one packet uploaded to #satnogs

Used hardware and software:

  • RX at 436.500 MHz Wide FM BW 8 kHz
  • 2 x 13 el LFA X-Yagi (InnovAntenna) horisontal polarization worked best
  • AlfaSpid RAS az/el rotor
  • LNA Mini-70 from SHF Elektronik
  • LMR-400 coax
  • Airspy Mini SDR
  • SDR-Console v3 with doppler correction of downlink and satellite tracking, rotor control
  • PstRotator for rotor control interface between SDR-Console and RAS controller
  • VB-Cable: virtual audio cable for piping audio from SDR Console to Soundmodem. Set to 96 kHz and 16 bit.
  • HS Soundmodem version INS-2TD v0.01b at 2400bd
  • GetKISS+ v 1.3.13 from DK3WN